| PTSD: Why Israel is a rogue, pirate state!

PTSD, the Perils Of Paranoia and why Israel is a rogue, pirate state!

1/ Cognitive dissonance,

2/ Tribal supremacism,

3/ Malignant narcissism.

4/ Always crying wolf.

5/ Killing the neighbours.

6/ Thieving their LAND.

7/ Blaming them.

8/ Making others PAY FOR IT.

9/ Never taking responsibility.

10/ Deserving to be cut LOOSE!

nutty un 5

CAN YOU THINK OF ANY MORE? 

 

| Discrimination Alert: Is this how the world views obese people?

Is this how the world views obese people? Overweight woman photographs strangers staring at her in the street in bizarre projectSADIE WHITELOCKS, Daily Mail.

An obese woman has captured the cruel looks and stares she attracts in public by photographing herself in different social settings.

Haley Morris-Cafiero, 37, an artist from Memphis, Tennessee, is seen sitting in restaurants, out shopping and strolling around bustling tourist attractions such as Times Square while curious passers-by are captured in the background.

Talking about the revealing collection of images she writes on her website: ‘I have always been aware of people making faces, commenting and laughing at me about my size.’

Center of attention: Ms Morris-Cafiero decided to capture the cruel looks and stares she attracts in public by photographing herself in different social settingsCenter of attention: Ms Morris-Cafiero decided to capture the cruel looks and stares she attracts in public by photographing herself in different social settings

She admits that her weight has been a constant battle and growing up she often felt ‘left out and awkward’.

Instead of talking about her body she refers to ‘my uncontrollable exterior’.

On the subject of her eating habits she told MailOnline: ‘My biggest temptation has to be donuts. They contain all of the caloric evils in one round, portable container: fried, bread and sugar,’

Explaining what inspired her picture series titled Wait Watchers, she said: ‘I decided to photograph myself sitting alone on the Times Square stairs to capture my solitude in a busy crowd.

Constant battle: Ms Morris-Cafiero said she has always had problems with her weight and she refers to her body as 'my uncontrollable exterior'Constant battle: Ms Morris-Cafiero said she has always had problems with her weight and she refers to her body as ‘my uncontrollable exterior’
It's rude to stare: A father and son look over as Ms Morris-Cafiero sits on a swing It’s rude to stare: A father and son look over as Ms Morris-Cafiero sits on a swing
Discriminated: Ms Morris-Cafiero said she has always been aware of people making faces, commenting and laughing at her about her sizeDiscriminated: Ms Morris-Cafiero said she has always been aware of people making faces, commenting and laughing at her about her size

‘After developing the film, I noticed that a man was standing behind me being photographed by an attractive blonde woman.

‘A man turns his back to gawk at me while I am photographing myself sitting at a cafe table’

‘Rather than pose for her camera, he was sneering at me behind my back.

‘Five minutes later and at another location, another man turns his back to gawk at me while I am photographing myself sitting at a cafe table.’

To get the photos she set up a visible camera on a tripod and set to work carrying out mundane tasks in front of the lens, such as eating, reading, or talking on the phone.

Ongoing project: Ms Morris-Cafiero started the social experiment in 2010 Ongoing project: Ms Morris-Cafiero started the social experiment in 2010
Globetrotter: The photographer's work took her to countries all over the world Globetrotter: The photographer’s work took her to countries all over the world
Laughing stock: A student sniggers as Ms Morris-Cafiero walks by with her camera Laughing stock: A student sniggers as Ms Morris-Cafiero walks by with her camera

She said that she has taken thousands of images of herself since starting the social experiment in 2010.

To ‘guarantee the most diverse pool of strangers’ she visited destinations all over the world including New York. Barcelona, Cuzco and Chicago.

Another of her projects called Something to Weigh, examines how her body fits into society. She positioned herself at locations including a swimming pool, casino and restaurant.

The images she said were an ‘attempt to juxtapose my place in the scene with issues that contribute to my weight gain’.

On the job: To capture the images she set up a visible camera, usually on a tripod, and set to work carrying out mundane tasks such as eating, reading or talking on the phoneOn the job: To capture the images she set up a visible camera, usually on a tripod, and set to work carrying out mundane tasks such as eating, reading or talking on the phone
Lonely figure: Ms Morris-Cafiero said growing up she often felt 'left out and awkward'Lonely figure: Ms Morris-Cafiero said growing up she often felt ‘left out and awkward’
Strike a pose: Ms Morris-Cafiero said that she has taken thousands of images of herself over the yearsStrike a pose: Ms Morris-Cafiero said that she has taken thousands of images of herself over the years

To date Ms Morris-Cafiero says her work has been well-received

Indeed one commentator wrote on lenscratch.com: ‘One of the most compelling, telling series of photographs about human nature and ‘what people think of us behind our back’ that I have seen. What courage…brava!

However she said that a few people have not been so enthusiastic.

‘The only criticism that I’ve gotten is that I’m being arrogant to think that people think anything about me,’ she told the Huffington Post.

Ms Morris-Cafiero studied art at the University of Arizona and photography at the University of North Florida.

Caloric evils: Ms Morris-Cafiero's biggest temptation is donuts Caloric evils: Ms Morris-Cafiero’s biggest temptation is donuts

She is currently the head of the photography department at Memphis College of Art and is one of twenty artists represented by the A.I.R. Gallery in New York.

According to the World Health Organization, more than one in ten of the world’s adult population is obese, yet ‘fat stigma’ is a common global problem.

Overweight and obese individuals are subject to discrimination in all kinds of situations and organizations such as the National Association to Advance Fat Acceptance (NAAFA) aim to reduce fat stigma.

However the media’s obsession with ‘size-zero celebrity’ make it a constant challenge.

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PREJUDICE

| US PTSD: One vet suicide every 80 minutes!

14 staggering stats about the invisible wounds of Iraq and Afghanistan.

Don’t miss Mac McClelland’s feature on the PTSD epidemic among returning vets, and how it’s spreading to their families.

  

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| Alcohol used to induce heart attack in order to save patient’s life!

Alcohol used to induce heart attack and save patient’s life ~ ELLA PICKOVER, The Independent.

 

Doctors have saved a patient’s life by killing off part of his heart with neat alcohol.

Medics used the rare treatment to induce a controlled heart attack.

Cardiologist Dr Tom Johnson said his patient Ronald Aldom would never have left the Bristol Heart Institute if his condition could not been treated.

The 77-year-old was suffering from a life threatening heart rhythm called ventricular tachycardia (VT) – which occurred as a result of a previous heart attack.

A team of surgeons tried to treat the condition using standard procedures but were unable to safely perform them.

The team decided to treat Mr Aldom, from Portishead near Bristol, with “ethanol ablation”.

The treatment has only been conducted a handful of times in the UK to treat VT, Dr Johnson said.

The procedure involves passing a catheter to the heart from the groin which identifies which part of the heart the dangerous rhythms are coming from.

A tiny balloon is then blown up in the heart artery supplying that area and a small amount of absolute alcohol is injected into the artery to produce a small controlled heart attack.

This kills the area of the heart muscle causing the problem allowing the heart’s rhythm to return to normal.

Mr Aldom said he was admitted to hospital after his implantable defibrillator (ICD) gave him a “thunderstorm of shocks”.

Dr Johnson, an interventional cardiologist, said: “Mr Aldom presented a couple of months ago with this life-threatening type rhythm disturbance, VT, which was related to the damage done to the heart – the scar associated with his previous heart attack.

“The defibrillator is there to try and prevent you from dropping dead in the community – they listen out for the heart doing unusual things – if your heart is doing something unusual like going very, very fast, firstly it will try and pace you out of that rhythm – it will try and suppress the activity within the heart.

“If that fails it will actually illicit a shock of energy across the heart which hopefully straightens things out and puts you back into a normal rhythm.

“It is potentially a rather difficult thing for a patient to live with because there is that threat that it could go off and actually when it does go off it is like being kicked in the chest.”

Mr Aldom added: “I was admitted to the Bristol Heart Institute after what doctors described as a thunderstorm of shocks from my ICD.

“I had an ICD fitted about ten years ago after I had a double by-pass operation at the hospital. The device gives my heart a shock when the rhythm becomes abnormal; however, I had about 30 shocks and knew there was something wrong.”

Dr Johnson said the team of medics tried to treat Mr Aldom’s irregular heartbeat with medication and “electrical ablation” to try and burn away – or kill off – the area of muscle which was generating the irregular heartbeats.

But they were unable to perform the procedures – so treating they decided to treat Mr Aldom with ethanol ablation.

“The alternative, unfortunately, was that he was going to die from his irregular heart rhythm,” he said.

Dr Johnson has previously performed the procedure for patients with Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy – a condition in which the heart muscle becomes thick – but this was his first use of the procedure to treat VT.

“The patient is doing tremendously well and is doing and is much better,” he said.

“He wasn’t going to leave hospital unless something was done. There was no other option.”

Mr Aldom added: “After the procedure I was out of hospital within about three days.

“I think it’s wonderful that the doctors tried everything to help me. If they hadn’t have done this I wouldn’t be here now.”

PA

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| Elementary: Train your mind like Sherlock with the Power of Concentration!

The Power of Concentration ~  MARIA KONNIKOVA, NYT.

MEDITATION and mindfulness: the words conjure images of yoga retreats and Buddhist monks. But perhaps they should evoke a very different picture: a man in a deerstalker, puffing away at a curved pipe, Mr. Sherlock Holmes himself. The world’s greatest fictional detective is someone who knows the value of concentration, of “throwing his brain out of action,” as Dr. Watson puts it. He is the quintessential unitasker in a multitasking world.

Time Life Pictures/Mansell via Getty Images

A drawing of Sherlock Holmes by Sidney Paget from 1891 in The Strand Magazine.

More often than not, when a new case is presented, Holmes does nothing more than sit back in his leather chair, close his eyes and put together his long-fingered hands in an attitude that begs silence. He may be the most inactive active detective out there. His approach to thought captures the very thing that cognitive psychologists mean when they say mindfulness.

Though the concept originates in ancient Buddhist, Hindu and Chinese traditions, when it comes to experimental psychology, mindfulness is less about spirituality and more about concentration: the ability to quiet your mind, focus your attention on the present, and dismiss any distractions that come your way. The formulation dates from the work of the psychologist Ellen Langer, who demonstrated in the 1970s that mindful thought could lead to improvements on measures of cognitive function and even vital functions in older adults.

Now we’re learning that the benefits may reach further still, and be more attainable, than Professor Langer could have then imagined. Even in small doses, mindfulness can effect impressive changes in how we feel and think — and it does so at a basic neural level.

In 2011, researchers from the University of Wisconsin demonstrated that daily meditation-like thought could shift frontal brain activity toward a pattern that is associated with what cognitive scientists call positive, approach-oriented emotional states — states that make us more likely to engage the world rather than to withdraw from it.

Participants were instructed to relax with their eyes closed, focus on their breathing, and acknowledge and release any random thoughts that might arise. Then they had the option of receiving nine 30-minute meditation training sessions over the next five weeks. When they were tested a second time, their neural activation patterns had undergone a striking leftward shift in frontal asymmetry — even when their practice and training averaged only 5 to 16 minutes a day.

As little as five minutes a day of intense Holmes-like inactivity, and a happier outlook is yours for the taking — though this particular benefit seems to have been lost on Holmes himself, what with his bouts of melancholy and his flirtations with a certain 7 percent solution. A quick survey will show that the paradox is illusory: Holmes is depressed when there is no target for his mental faculties. Give him a project, and balance is restored.

But mindfulness goes beyond improving emotion regulation. An exercise in mindfulness can also help with that plague of modern existence: multitasking. Of course, we would like to believe that our attention is infinite, but it isn’t. Multitasking is a persistent myth. What we really do is shift our attention rapidly from task to task. Two bad things happen as a result. We don’t devote as much attention to any one thing, and we sacrifice the quality of our attention. When we are mindful, some of that attentional flightiness disappears as if of its own accord.

In 2012, researchers led by a team from the University of Washington examined the effects of meditation training on multitasking in a real-world setting. They asked a group of human resources professionals to engage in the type of simultaneous planning they did habitually. Each participant was placed in a one-person office, with a laptop and a phone, and asked to complete several typical tasks: schedule meetings for multiple attendees, locate free conference rooms, write a memo that proposed a creative agenda item and the like. The information necessary to complete those tasks? Delivered as it otherwise would be: by e-mail, through instant messages, over the phone and in person. The list was supposed to be completed in 20 minutes or less.

After the multitasking free-for-all, participants were divided into three groups: one was assigned to an eight-week meditation course (two hours of instruction, weekly); another group didn’t take the course at first, but took it later; and the last group took an eight-week course in body relaxation. Everyone was put through a second round of frenzy.

The only participants to show improvement were those who had received the mindfulness training. Not only did they report fewer negative emotions at the end of the assignment, but their ability to concentrate improved significantly. They could stay on task longer and they switched between tasks less frequently. While the overall time they devoted to the assignment didn’t differ much from that of other groups, they spent it more efficiently. They engaged, on average, in just over 40 discreet “tasks” — test-related behaviors that had a definable start and end time — spending approximately 36 seconds on each, in contrast to the 48 to 50 average tasks attempted by the other groups — with an average of only 30 seconds spent per activity. They also remembered what they did better than the other participants in the study.

The concentration benefits of mindfulness training aren’t just behavioral; they’re physical. In recent years, mindfulness has been shown to improve connectivity inside our brain’s attentional networks, as well as between attentional and medial frontal regions — changes that save us from distraction. Mindfulness, in other words, helps our attention networks communicate better and with fewer interruptions than they otherwise would.

In a 2012 study at Emory University, increased meditation practice was associated with enhanced connectivity between the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, a part of the brain involved in attention monitoring and working memory, and the right insula, an area that is associated with how well we can monitor our own feelings and thoughts and that is considered a key waypoint between our two major attention networks, the default and the executive.

Not only could this increased connectivity make us better able to switch between tasks and monitor our own attention, but it is indicative of more effective overall management of our finite attentional resources.

Mindfulness training has even been shown to affect the brain’s default network — the network of connections that remains active when we are in a so-called resting state — with regular meditators exhibiting increased resting-state functional connectivity and increased connectivity generally. After a dose of mindfulness, the default network has greater consistent access to information about our internal states and an enhanced ability to monitor the surrounding environment.

These effects make sense: the core of mindfulness is the ability to pay attention. That’s exactly what Holmes does when he taps together the tips of his fingers, or exhales a fine cloud of smoke. He is centering his attention on a single element. And somehow, despite the seeming pause in activity, he emerges, time and time again, far ahead of his energetic colleagues. In the time it takes old detective Mac to traipse around all those country towns in search of a missing bicyclist in “The Valley of Fear,” Holmes solves the entire crime without leaving the room where the murder occurred. That’s the thing about mindfulness. It seems to slow you down, but it actually gives you the resources you need to speed up your thinking.

The difference between a Holmes and a Watson is, essentially, one of practice. Attention is finite, it’s true — but it is also trainable. Through modifying our practices of thought toward a more Holmes-like concentration, we can build up neural real estate that is better able to deal with the variegated demands of the endlessly multitasking, infinitely connected modern world. And even if we’ve never attempted mindfulness in the past, we might be surprised at how quickly the benefits become noticeable.

Until recently, our 20s were considered the point when our brain’s wiring was basically complete. But new evidence suggests that not only can we learn into old age, but the structure of our brains can continue to change and develop. In 2006, a team of psychologists demonstrated that the neural activation patterns of older adults (specifically, activation in the prefrontal cortex), began to resemble those of much younger subjects after just five one-hour training sessions on a task of attentional control. Their brains became more efficient at coordinating multiple tasks — and the benefit transferred to untrained activities, suggesting that it was symptomatic of general improvement.

Similar changes have been observed in the default network (the brain’s resting-state activity). In 2012, researchers from Ohio State University demonstrated that older adults who scored higher on mindfulness scales had increased connectivity in their default networks, specifically in two of the brain’s major information processing hubs. And while we already know that this kind of increased connectivity is a very good thing, there’s more to these particular results. The precise areas that show increased connectivity with mindfulness are also known to be pathophysiological sites of Alzheimer’s disease.

The implications are tantalizing. Mindfulness may have a prophylactic effect: it can strengthen the areas that are most susceptible to cognitive decline. When we learn to unitask, to think more in line with Holmes’s detached approach, we may be doing more than increasing our observational prowess. We may be investing in a sounder mental future — no matter how old we are.

Maria Konnikova is the author of “Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes” and a doctoral candidate in psychology at Columbia.

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George-Carlin2

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| Crash teenager declared brain dead by 4 Doctors fully recovers!

Teenager declared brain-dead by FOUR doctors makes miracle recovery moments before life support machine was switched off after father plead for second opinion ~  MATT BLAKE, Daily Mail.

A teenager who was declared brain dead by four doctors made a ‘miracle’ recovery after his parents begged medics for a second opinion – moments before his life support was to be switched off.

Doctors described Steven Thorpe as ‘truly a unique case’ after he awoke from a two-week coma following a multiple car crash that claimed the life of his schoolfriend.

Steven, then 17, was travelling in a Rover with pals Matthew Jones, 18, and Harry Dipper in the early hours of February 1 2008 when a stray horse ran into the path of the car ahead.

Unable to dodge the beast, the car flipped in front of them and back-seat passenger Steven was flung into the road in the pile up that ensued, which also included a black cab. He never recovered from his injuries.

Steven, who is now 21, was placed in a chemically-induced coma and doctors said he would never recover – they even asked his devastated parents to consider donating his organs.

But Steven’s father asked doctors to reconsider and enlisted private GP Julia Piper to examine him again after being convinced that their son could recover.

Doctors at University Hospital in Coventry, West Midlands, agreed to let a neurologist re-examine him and, astonishingly, he detected faint brain waves indicating Steven had a slim chance of making a recovery.

NHS chiefs agreed to bring Steven out of his coma to see if he could survive on his own and he stunned medics by making an almost full recovery.

Incredibly, just five weeks later Steven was discharged from hospital.

Speaking about his amazing recovery for the first time, Steven, now aged 21 and a trainee accountant, said: ‘My father believed I was still there.

‘He expressed his views to Julia Piper and I think she listened very closely to what my dad had said.

‘My impression is maybe the hospital weren’t very happy that my father wanted a second opinion.

‘I think the doctors wanted to give me three days on the life support machine and the following day they said they wanted to turn it off.

‘The words they used to my parents were ‘you need to start thinking about organ donations’.

‘I think that’s what gave my dad energy, he thought ‘no way’.

Savior: Steven with Dr Julia Piper who saved his life in Leicester. She made doctors take a second look at him before making the final decision to switch his life-support machine offSavior: Steven with Dr Julia Piper who saved his life in Leicester. She made doctors take a second look at him before making the final decision to switch his life-support machine off

‘I think if my dad would’ve agreed with them then it would’ve been off in seconds.

‘If my parents hadn’t asked for the second opinion, and if Julia hadn’t been there, I wouldn’t be here today.’

Steven, from Kenilworth, Warkwickshire, was travelling home from nearby Leamington Spa in February 2008 when the vehicle he was in was involved in a collision with two other cars and a horse that had run loose.

The crash left one man dead and the horse was also fatally injured.

Steven added: ‘As far as I am concerned, living is a full recovery. From how I was to how I am now, I think it’s a miracle.

‘I drive to work every day, I don’t think anything is holding me back. There’s no point dwelling on it, I just pull my socks up and get on with it.

‘Hopefully it can help people see that you should never give up. I’ve had so much positive feedback about it.

Life saving: General Practice in Leicester, run by Dr Piper Life saving: General Practice in Leicester, run by Dr Piper

‘If you believe it then follow it, that’s the motto. My father believed I was alive – and he was correct.

‘It’s hard for me to even ask my parents about what happened.

‘They do cooperate with me because they want me to understand it all but they don’t want to be reminded about it.’

Dr Piper, who runs a private practice in Leicester, said: ‘They had doctors saying he wasn’t going to live but the parents felt there was flickers of response and it wasn’t just wishful thinking.

‘I had this strong feeling that this wasn’t right and then eventually I got someone else to look at him and of course it proved to have been the right thing to have done.

Miracle: Steven after two operations on his face following the car crash in which another man diedMiracle: Steven after two operations on his face following the car crash in which another man died

‘It’s an inspirational story about never giving up.

‘He’s a remarkable young man and his recovery has been astonishing.’

Since leaving hospital four years ago, Steven has had four operations to reconstruct his mangled face – including having his nose rebuilt and an artificial eye socket made.

He also has physiotherapy session to improve the movement in his left arm – which was badly injured in the road smash.

In a statement, University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust said: ‘The injury to Steven’s brain was extremely critical and several CT scans of the head showed almost irreversible damage.

‘It is extremely rare that a patient having suffered such extensive trauma to the brain should survive.

‘However, critical care and other specialist teams continued to support his systems through his critical period and we were delighted to see Steven recover and make progress against all the odds.

‘He is truly a unique case.’