The Road to Tantura Journey

By Marivel Guzman

For the supporters of Israel who romanticize the creation of Israel as an event of resilience and courage, let me tell you that creating a village on the ruins and blood of the native residents is not romantic at all.

One of our own #Celebs4Palestine, #HalaGabriel, An American filmmaker, a Palestinian born in exile in Syria after all her family were expelled from their village in Palestine in 1948. Gabriel presents you with her “Road to Tantura Journey,” in one documentary; “Tantura.”

Tantura is a village in the Mediterranean shores of Palestine now called Tantura, Israel.

Gabriel’s documentary takes you in a journey of remembrance and pain; What is to be a refugee; how her village was invaded by Israeli army and through the voices of historians and survivors the film “speaks” how the men were put in open concentration camps and some left to died by thirst and starvation.

“Tantura” walks you through the exodus of Palestinians that ended in Syria and Lebanon as refugees, some still living in tents–How the lives of refugees transform from living in beautiful-monument homes to live in tents. The story repeats for Palestinians that until recently lived in Syria refugee camps, now, are again forced to another exodus of survival. Their story repeats after 70 years of exodus from their native Tantura to open concentrations camps in Europe.

You can read in The Jerusalem Post an account of the events in its article The Tantura ‘Massacre’ Affair, published Feb. 09, 2004. The article was based on the writtings by historian Benny Morris, “The Birth of the Palestinian Refugee Problems,” originally published on by Cambridge University Press (New York, NY) on 1988.

“Tantura” gives you a glimpse of the horrors residents of Tantura, Palestine suffered on the hands of the “heroic” Israeli soldiers who came to her family village. Some of those soldiers who just two years previous to the invasion of Tantura have suffered the same ordeal in Germany under the Nazi regime. A retired Israel soldier excused his participation in the invasion with “You have to ask yourself, he said,” “who gave the order.” Regardless of who gave the order; the story of displacement and murder of the residents of the village was the same.

Gabriel started the project “The Road to Tantura,” more than 10 years ago, now to finish the documentary “Tantura,” she has opened a kickstarter fund where you can help her to finish the journey.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in World by Akashma Online News. Bookmark the permalink.

About Akashma Online News

Gaza: Long History of Wars and Defiance By Marivel Guzman Gaza is one of the world’s oldest living cities. It is a city held to be of major strategic importance. It was the only overland route between Africa and Asia, which led Egypt to establish, in 3500 B.C., the citadel of Tell Sakan on the banks of the Wadi Ghazzeh, some 12km from the modern city. In the second millennia B.C., the Egyptians lost control of the city to the “Hyksos”, who expanded Gaza nearer to the sea front and built “Tell Al-Ajjul”. Hyksos people marched southward and captured the Great Egyptian Empire, about 1650 B.C. They lasted around 100 years, before the Egyptian Army chased them out to the outskirts of Gaza. History informs us that the Egyptian then failed to crack Gaza and retreated. Some 200 years later Gaza once again fell under the domination of Egypt, an event marked in history as the conquest by Thutmose III on April 25, 1468 B.C. Gaza’s history has been shaped by its strategic location; in 734 B.C., the Assyrian Empire took complete control of Gaza. The Persian Empire in 539 B.C. expanded and annexed Gaza. In Gaza there is the ancient Greek city of Antidon dated to around 520 B.C., a port and settlement four kilometers from the Gaza city. In 332 B.C., Alexander the Great besieged Gaza, the last city to resist his design, for the control of the ancient world. Most of the old Babylonian domain, including Egypt, swiftly fell into Alexander’s hands. Gaza dared to resist; a siege of two months followed by a ruin as complete as that of Tyre. The defenders, mostly local Arabs, fought to death, the women and children were taken captive. In 145 B.C. Gaza was conquered by Jonathan the Hasmonean (brother of Judah the Maccabee) who destroyed the suburbs of Gaza by fire. The Jewish King Alexander Jannaeus, after a siege of a year, brought destruction and massacres around 96 B.C. Neither Alexander the Great’s bloody conquest in 332 B.C. nor the brutal one by Alexander Janneus in 96 B.C. could vanquish Gaza who endured and rose again. Around 50 B.C. Gaza became magnificent and so luxurious under the Romans. Gaza would reach the peak of civilization; its exports in the 5th century A.D. (during the Byzantine Empire) reached as far as England, Ireland and Geneva, Gaza’s schools graduated leading theologians such as Barsanuphius, John of Gaza and Mark the Deacon, whose writings profoundly influenced Christianity at its early stages. According to the Jewish Encyclopedia, famous Gazan Jews included the medieval liturgical poet Israel Najara, who is buried in Gaza’s local cemetery, the Sa

One thought on “The Road to Tantura Journey

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s