| FACT CHECK: Easter’s dark side: ISHTAR!

| FACT CHECK:
Easter‘s dark side.
Easter, or, more properly: ISHTAR, complete with symbolic eggs and rabbit, was in fact, a pagan Babylonian and Assyrian deity festival, signifying fertility and sexuality, later syncretically adopted by the Romans, and formally introduced into Christianity by Emperor Constantine.

Ishtar FACT

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ALSO SEE:

The Pagan Origin Of Easter

“Every year, on the first Sunday after the first full moon after the spring equinox, a celebration was made.

It was Ishtar’s Sunday and was celebrated with rabbits and eggs.

Ishtar also proclaimed that because Tammuz was killed by a pig, that a pig must be eaten on that Sunday.

By now, the readers of this tract should have made the connection that paganism has infiltrated the contemporary “Christian” churches, and further study indicates that this paganism came in by way of the Roman Catholic System.

The truth is that Easter has nothing whatsoever to do with the resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.

We also know that Easter can be as much as three weeks away from the Passover, because the pagan holiday is always set as the first Sunday after the first full moon after the spring equinox.”

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Transfiguration before crucifixion

وَقَوْلِهِمْ إِنَّا قَتَلْنَا الْمَسِيحَ عِيسَى ابْنَ مَرْيَمَ رَسُولَ اللّهِ وَمَا قَتَلُوهُ وَمَا صَلَبُوهُ وَلَكِن شُبِّهَ لَهُمْ وَإِنَّ الَّذِينَ اخْتَلَفُواْ فِيهِ لَفِي شَكٍّ مِّنْهُ مَا لَهُم بِهِ مِنْ عِلْمٍ إِلاَّ اتِّبَاعَ الظَّنِّ وَمَا قَتَلُوهُ يَقِينًا

“And [for] their saying, “Indeed, we have killed the Messiah, Jesus, the son of Mary, the messenger of Allah.” And they did not kill him, nor did they crucify him; but [another] was made to resemble him to them. And indeed, those who differ over it are in doubt about it. They have no knowledge of it except the following of assumption. And they did not kill him, for certain.” ~ QURAN 4:157

12 thoughts on “| FACT CHECK: Easter’s dark side: ISHTAR!

  1. Pingback: What does a Rabbit have to do with Easter? | xenophobia22

  2. Pingback: PAGAN OR CHRISTIAN | HIGH OFF THE SERPENT'S VENOM

  3. Curiouser and curiouser… I wonder what’s the reason for this polemic? Ok, many christian fundamentalists, who are defined by their absolute submission to the holy scripture, paradoxically do not really study their fundament. Ishtar is clearly a part of the judeo-christian-muslim heritage too. In fact, one of the holy scriptures of the Tanakha, the old testament, are dedicated to her: the book of Esther rendering the release of the Jewish people, in which a Jewish girl (or rather a Benjaminian girl, since she’s not of the tribe of Judah:) Hadassa is elevated to the divine status, Esther, the Babylonian Ishtar, being the consort of the God-king Ahasuerus, (as Mary Magdalene is the consort, and the ritual annointer of Jesus, making him Messiah). Xšayaršā Shah is a title signifying ruler and redeemer of the World, the four courners of the world, Messiah, most often interpreted as Xerxex the first, but possibly a more astro- or cosmometaphorical (i.e. prophetic, astromythological) reading will be more fruitful, than to necessarily and absolutely connecting him to one specific historical emperor; although It may not be contested that this scripture, the Book of Esther, relate the emergence of the Proto-Monotheistic Zoroastrianism as the imperial religion. It seem to be no doubt that the Jewish religion from this moment, the release from the Babylonian captivity, further many elements from the Zoroastrian Babyolonian cosmology. We may speculate that the Zoroastrian religion conflates with the religious cosmology of the 12-tribes confederation, the post exodus Israel, but Israel is here understood not so much as a de facto historical land as a continuous ideal state of the empires as opposed to the Edom, representing the chaotic, wild state, whether be of the Miphraimic/Egyptian dynasties, or the Sumerian/Babylonian empires, which are overlapping. Israel always at the heart of this overlapping East-West (and North-South).

    To me what makes a scripture sacred, is that it refers to and constitute a cosmovision, and is practiced, not merely in terms of commandments or rules, but is celebrated throughout the festivals of the years, and used liturgically in regard of natural cycles, situating the nation, that is the people defined by it’s ceremonial practices, within a greater cosmic scheme. This is at least what I see is common for people who are doing the practice of sacred literature, whether Vedic, or Jewish, Christian and Muslim.

    In the Book of Esther, the Star of the Morning, we’re told Ahasuerus, is ruling over 127 provinces, from India to Kush, which interestingly also includes all of Egypt. There’s some interesting clues we may derive from his name, Ahasuerus or Xerxes, or rather; the true x-š-y-a-r-š-a, is implying not a personal name, but the divine, most sovereign King of Kings. With the help of the online Iranian encyclopedia I learn that Xerxes is the common Greek (Xérxēs) and Latin form (Xerxes, Xerses) of the Achaemenid throne-name which in Old Persian is spelled x-š-y-a-r-š-a (with the initial a- of the second element being spread into medial position) and must be interpreted as four-syllable Xšaya-ṛšā (thus first P. Tedesco in Herzfeld, pp. 97 f. and Hoffmann, p. 85, fn. 15). The very christian notion Christ as King of Kings is quite obviously derived from here.

    This form, Xšyaršā and the secondary contracted form Xšayaršā are reflected more or less accurately in Babylonian Ḫi-ši-ʾ-ar-šá/ši, Ḫi-ši-(i-)ar-ši/šú, Aḫ-ši-ia-ar-šú, Ak-ši-ia-ar-šú, Ak-ši-ia-mar-šú (with many other variants; cf. Dandamayev, pp. 82 f., no. 145; Tavernier, pp. 23 f., 66 ff.; Zadok, pp. 207-24, no. 283), Aram. ḥšyʾrš, ḥšyrš, ʾḥšyrš (cf. Porten and Lund, p. 356a), Bibl.-Aram. ʾḥšwrwš (with the wrong vocalization “Aḥašwērōš”), and Egyptian ḫšjrš, ḫšj’arš (cf. Vittmann, p. 164). From all those renderings are different both Elamite Ik-še-ir-(iš-)šá (cf. Hinz and Koch, p. 750), that is, /Kšerša/ or the like, and Greek Xérxēs (originating in *Xérsēs by distance-assimilation x––x from x––s), which apparently render a shorter two-syllable form *Xšairšā or even monophthongized *Xšēršā; this medially shortened form must have existed already in Old Iranian (probably in spoken Old Persian) and was not created only in Greek (with a quite regular intermediate *Xeírsēs or *Xeírxēs) and Elamite respectively. The longstanding view that the Greek form Xérxēs goes back to the attested Old Persian form through *Xḗrxēs, *Xāˊrxās, and Old Iranian *Xšāršā must be given up for phonological reasons (see esp. Schmitt, 1996, pp. 88 f.), and a common explanation for both the Elamite and the Greek form (which are remarkably similar to each other) must in any case be preferred.

    Old Persian Xšaya-ṛšā is a compound with the verbal stem xšaya- “ruling” as the first element and the n-stem noun *ṛšan- “hero, man” as the second element; the original n-stem paradigm, however, is preserved only in the nominative form, whereas the other cases are remodeled analogically in one way or another (see Kent, p. 65a); with the primary meaning “ruling over heroes”. It is close to Vedic kṣayád-vīra- “id.” with a similar formation. Where we can see a pretty clear connection to the name of the ruling caste of the vedic cultures, the ksatriyas. In connecting these things it is not so easy to say that Ishtar is the pagan origin of Easter, or Eszter, but rather Ishtar, must be seen as an important devine cosmic feminine element within the very roots of the Judeo-Christian-Muslim tradition; not alien, although alienated and surpressed indeed.

    Ishtar, if we accept her as synonymous with Inanna, is not dark, but she certaintly has a dark aspect, or rather she has a dark twin-sister, Irkalla, or Eretzikigal, which may be seen as a personification of Hell, or the underworld, who may have served as a model for the Whore of Babylon.

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  4. I do not celebrate Easter, but I do celebrate the Resurrection of my Savior!!!! No jelly beans, bunny rabbits, or chocolate rabbits. Just pure joy and rejoicing that our Savior Lives! He has RISEN! And I share my knowledge of Him every day…I celebrate Him every day! Because He lives, we live also!!
    Matt 27:50-54 “Jesus, when he had cried again with a loud voice, yielded up the ghost. And, behold, the veil of the temple was rent in twain from the top to the bottom; and the earth did quake, and the rocks rent; And the graves were opened; and many bodies of the saints which slept arose, And came out of the graves after his resurrection, and went into the holy city, and appeared unto many. Now when the centurion, and they that were with him, watching Jesus, saw the earthquake, and those things that were done, they feared greatly, saying, Truly this was the Son of God.”

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    • Transfiguration before crucifixion

      وَقَوْلِهِمْ إِنَّا قَتَلْنَا الْمَسِيحَ عِيسَى ابْنَ مَرْيَمَ رَسُولَ اللّهِ وَمَا قَتَلُوهُ وَمَا صَلَبُوهُ وَلَكِن شُبِّهَ لَهُمْ وَإِنَّ الَّذِينَ اخْتَلَفُواْ فِيهِ لَفِي شَكٍّ مِّنْهُ مَا لَهُم بِهِ مِنْ عِلْمٍ إِلاَّ اتِّبَاعَ الظَّنِّ وَمَا قَتَلُوهُ يَقِينًا

      And [for] their saying, “Indeed, we have killed the Messiah, Jesus, the son of Mary, the messenger of Allah.” And they did not kill him, nor did they crucify him; but [another] was made to resemble him to them. And indeed, those who differ over it are in doubt about it. They have no knowledge of it except the following of assumption. And they did not kill him, for certain QURAN 4:157

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  5. Wrong. Ishtar has zero to do with Easter. In Acts 12:4 Luke wrote pascha which is the word used to denote Passover. Had Luke meant Ishtar, Luke would have written Ishtar….but he did not. Pascha was translated Easter because the word Easter means Resurrection Day and has always meant Resurrection Day. Hislop’s writings on the subject were commensurate with his name….sloppy….very sloppy research. The Coverdale bible has “Easter” in nearly every single place one finds “Passover” because Miles Coverdale honored the resurrection as the fulfillment of Passover. The Bishop’s bible also used Easter in several places. But the King James bible is the only one that got it 100% correct as Acts 12:4 is the only place Easter fits in perfect context and it has zero to do with any pagan holiday despite the widespread ignorance that is parroted among Christian “scholars” today.

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  6. Easter is NOT named after the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. This is a meme that is circulating the internet and is not correct. Just because the name ‘sounds’ similar is no reason to believe that. The name Ishtar is Semitic, whereas the term ‘Easter’ is of Germanic origin.

    The name is Easter is the English term for the Christian. The Romans called it Pascha. The Anglo-Saxon days had a goddess named Eostre. She was the goddess of spring and the month of the spring, most probably at the time of the spring equinox, was named after her, as was explained by Bede in his book ‘On the Reckoning of Time’ (http://www.tertullian.org/rpearse/bede_on_eostre.htm).

    That name, Eostre, has come down through Middle English and into Modern English, as ‘Easter’.

    See also: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_of_Easter

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