| FACT CHECK: Easter’s dark side: ISHTAR!

Originally posted on | truthaholics:

| FACT CHECK:
Easter‘s dark side.
Easter, or, more properly: ISHTAR, complete with symbolic eggs and rabbit, was in fact, a pagan Babylonian and Assyrian deity festival, signifying fertility and sexuality, later syncretically adopted by the Romans, and formally introduced into Christianity by Emperor Constantine.

Ishtar FACT

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ALSO SEE:

The Pagan Origin Of Easter

“Every year, on the first Sunday after the first full moon after the spring equinox, a celebration was made.

It was Ishtar’s Sunday and was celebrated with rabbits and eggs.

Ishtar also proclaimed that because Tammuz was killed by a pig, that a pig must be eaten on that Sunday.

By now, the readers of this tract should have made the connection that paganism has infiltrated the contemporary “Christian” churches, and further study indicates that this paganism came in by way of the Roman Catholic System.

The truth is that Easter has nothing whatsoever…

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A LUTHER FOR FAMILY LAW

truthaholics:

Now’s as Good a time as any for root and branch reform to remedy the disproportionality and disrepute the UK Family Justice system has dragged itself down to.

Originally posted on dbfamilylaw:

Delivery of fair and accessible justice

In October 1517 Martin Luther pinned his 95 theses to the church door in Wittenberg. He translated the bible to his native German (New Testament published in 1522). He explained that priests were unnecessary for intercession between ordinary people and God. His, and later, versions of the bible translated by, for example, Tyndale and in the King James Authorised Version of 1611 were revolutionary. Anyone who could read, or listen to the text read to them, could find out what hitherto only a tiny educated minority could read. In a society where politics and religion were inseparable, and church attendance obligatory, what people discovered was truly liberating; and set sixteenth century Europe on course for politico-religious and civil war.

The bible and other religious literature were written in a language which was foreign to all but a tiny, often cloistered, minority of the population…

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I ain’t Happy

truthaholics:

No harm in living it up but gotta keep it real!

Originally posted on Escape The Cage:

“People get used to anything. The less you think about your oppression, the more your tolerance for it grows. After a while, people just think oppression is the normal state of things. But to become free, you have to be acutely aware of being a slave” – Assata Shakur

Today was a frustrating day. Everywhere, I was bombarded with the #HappyBritishMuslims tagline. I didn’t get why at first; I thought it was merely one of those vacuous hashtags that trend on Twitter. That was until I found the video below. Intrigued, I clicked the play button:

I thought it would make sense. I watched it repeatedly, allowing myself the possibility of having perhaps missed something, the moral of the story, if you will. But in the end, having exhausted all rational speculations, I was left to dwell on an uneasy mixture of embarrassment, disillusionment, and defeat. I have a few problems with what is evidently…

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| UN rights expert urges Israel to prevent takeover of West Bank building by settlers!

UN rights expert urges Israel to prevent takeover of West Bank building by settlers ~ UN News Centre.

15 April 2014 – An independent United Nations human rights expert today urged Israel to prevent settlers from taking over Al-Rajabi House, a building in the West Bank city of Hebron that was built by Palestinian families but whose ownership was granted to the settlers after a protracted legal battle.

The four-story building capable of housing 40 families is located strategically between the illegal settlement of Kiryat Arba and the Ibrahami Mosque, also known as Cave of Patriarchs, in the old city of Hebron.

“This is the first time a new settlement in the heart of Hebron is created since the 1980s – and would add to the ordeal of the Palestinian community,” stressed the UN Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Palestinian territories occupied since 1967, Richard Falk.

Displaced Palestinians with their belongings, following Israeli authorities demolition of their structures in Ein al Hilwa (Tubas Governorate) in the Jordan Valley on 30 January 2014. Photo: Credit: OCHA oPt (file photo)

“There could be nothing worse to stoke renewed violence than the creation of a new settlement in the heart of old Hebron,” he added in a news release.

Noting that three settler families have already moved into the building, Mr. Falk warned that this will likely mean “more movement restrictions for Palestinians in the area, more road closures, and more harassment of Palestinian residents and human rights defenders by settlers.”

According to the news release, settlers illegally occupied the building being built by Palestinian families in March 2007, and remained there until December 2008 when an Israeli Supreme Court decision evicted the settlers pending a thorough judicial review of ownership claims.

During that time, the UN and non-governmental human rights organisations witnessed a sharp rise in settler violence and harassment against Palestinian residents living in the close vicinity. The building was ordered to remain vacant after the Supreme Court ruling.

On 11 March 2014, the Supreme Court issued its final decision rejecting an appeal submitted by Palestinians, and ruled in favour of settler ownership of the house. These settlers moved into Al-Rajabi house on Sunday after the Israeli Minister for Defense gave the green light.

“Hebron embodies all the worst features of apartheid, colonialism and oppression that are to be found throughout occupied Palestine,” Mr. Falk noted, as he described a divided town of “checkpoints, walls, barbed wires and apartheid roads” where settlers and Palestinians are kept apart despite living within metres of each other.

The Special Rapporteur noted that the residents of the largest nearby settlement, Kiryat Arba, were among the most extreme and ideologically motivated settlers in the West Bank, and has given rise to numerous incidents of violence over the years.

Besides Kiryat Arba, Mr. Falk recalled, there are already several small Israeli settlements in or near the old city of Hebron that have created severe restrictions and an atmosphere of continuous tension that adversely affects all Palestinians.

“This unacceptable situation is aggravated by a lack of law enforcement by Israeli security forces,” he said. “What once was a vibrant market in the heart of Hebron is now a ghost town.”

He went on to state that the establishment of settlements in the West Bank is a clear violation of international law and contravenes the Fourth Geneva Convention, and noted that the UN International Court of Justice had come to the same conclusion in an advisory opinion issued 10 years ago.

“Israel must take steps to comply with international law and ensure that tensions – already high in Hebron – do not get out of control,” Mr. Falk urged.

Mr. Falk added that the establishment of this settlement at Al-Rajabi House was a move toward connecting the illegal settlement of Kiryat Arba with the other outposts in the old city of Hebron and the Ibrahami Mosque (or Cave of Patriarchs) – the site of the 1994 massacre of Palestinians during prayer time by a settler from Kiryat Arba.

Independent experts or special rapporteurs are appointed by the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva to examine and report back on a country situation or a specific human rights theme. The positions are honorary and the experts are not UN staff, nor are they paid for their work.


News Tracker: past stories on this issue

UN chief ‘deeply concerned’ by Israel’s continuing West Bank settlement expansion

Modern Tories on rape, Down syndrome, Pakistani children and black people

NATO uses old images taken in August 2013 to claim that Russian troops are deployed on Ukrainian Borders

truthaholics:

You can’t make this up – or, can you?

Originally posted on Counter Information:

Global Research, April 11, 2014
nato3
NATO wants to justify it’s existence and what better way than to show a big build up of Russian troops on Ukraine’s border. Fact is that the pictures are from August 2013. The military adventures of recent years by NATO, shows that it likes to use fake pictures and videos in order to justify invasions and gaining support at home for unpopular wars

Russian troops on Ukraine's border in 2013

copyright NATO

“Satellite imagery of Russian troops allegedly amassed at present on the border with Ukraine dates back to August 2013, a high-ranking source in Russia,” General Staff said Thursday.NATO’s Headquarters of Allied Command Operations released earlier on Thursday a series of satellite photos showing large contingents of tanks, artillery, attack helicopters and war planes purportedly being observed by the Alliance in specific locations along the Ukrainian border.

“In reality, the images released by…

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Israel demolish EU-funded projects in the E1 corridor of the West Bank

truthaholics:

Ziocolony Israel’s hubris : How to go bump from ‘poof!’

Originally posted on altahrir, news of Islam, Muslims, Arab Spring and special Palestine:


Israel has seized three EU-funded humanitarian aid projects on the edge of a settlement construction zone that Europe views as as a ‘red line’, spurring demands for compensation payments to Brussels at a crisis moment for John Kerry’s Mideast peace bid.

The three humanitarian aid shelters were dismantled on 8 April in Ras-a-Baba, also known as Jabal-al-Baba, which lies in the E1 corridor of the West Bank, linking the settlement of Ma’ale Adumim to Jerusalem.

All three shelters were prefabricated caravans, built for families made homeless in severe storms that hit the region in December. They were funded by the EU’s humanitarian aid wing, DG ECHO, and some were provided by teh French development agency, Action Contre la Faim (ACF).

Saeb Erekat, the chief Palestinian negotiator, told EurActiv that seizure was « more than a provocation, it is a crime, » and linked it to the deteriorating Mideast peace process.

« We ask the…

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| Silverstein: For a Ground Zero Developer Seeking Subsidies, More Is Never Enough!

For a Ground Zero Developer Seeking Subsidies, More Is Never Enough ~ NYT.

The developer and philanthropist Larry A. Silverstein has cut a striking figure in New York City. He owns the H.M.S. Bounty-size yacht favored by his peers and has dominated the rebuilding of ground zero for a decade.

Along the way, he has internalized a developer’s rule of thumb in New York: Only a rube puts much of his own money at risk.

Billions of dollars in Liberty bonds, insurance money, developer fees: Year after year, Mr. Silverstein has shaken the public tree and benefits have fallen to the ground.

Construction of 4 World Trade Center is completed and it stands about half empty, with commitments from just two tenants: New York City and State. Now Mr. Silverstein wants to complete his 70-something-story 3 World Trade Center. He has found just one prospective tenant for it.

Photo

Larry A. Silverstein’s prospective tenant for 3 World Trade Center, GroupM, has been promised $15 million and tax breaks of about $75 million. CreditAndrew Burton/Getty Images

City and state officials, ever helpful, agreed to give that company, GroupM, a $15 million cash subsidy and tax breaks worth about $75 million.

Now Mr. Silverstein wants to shake the tree again. In March, as Charles V. Bagli reported in The New York Times, he asked the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey to guarantee up to $1.2 billion of his construction loans. The authority’s board could vote on the proposal this month.

As chutzpah, this was impressive. As public policy, it was less salutary.

Kenneth Lipper is a board member of the Port Authority, a former deputy mayor under Edward I. Koch, an investment banker and a novelist with a keen eye for currents of power, municipal and financial.

In an interview on Monday, he described how the board had signed off this winter on a capital plan, carefully assigning priority to rebuilt bridges, a new terminal at La Guardia Airport and — Mr. Lipper’s personal favorite — the rebuilding of that corroding pile of metal and concrete that is the Port Authority bus station in Midtown.

No choice was easy. The Port Authority’s bond rating is sterling, which keeps its interest rates low. In the end, its rating is backed by hundreds of millions of toll-paying commuters.

Then Mr. Lipper saw the request from Mr. Silverstein.

“Am I in ‘Alice in Wonderland’?” he recalled thinking. “I wanted to get a modern bus terminal built and we’re talking about putting $1.2 billion into a private developer, in which he gets the gain and we take the hit?

“Is it the role of an agency representing taxpayers and toll payers to speculate in real estate?”

This city harbors many expert practitioners of state capitalism. In Brooklyn, Bruce Ratner has built project after project, with a savant’s touch for finding the most gilded subsidy.

At least twice since 2001, Mr. Silverstein and city and state officials have cut the deal of all deals, the no-mas, this-is-the-final-subsidy moment.

Then that moment passes and Mr. Silverstein asks for more.

Bettina Damiani, the project director of Good Jobs New York, which monitors development subsidies and spending, has totaled and retotaled the subsidies for the rebuilding at the ground zero site, which comprises 16 acres. Even she has waved a white flag.

“We had such a good handle on it,” she said. “And at some point they pull another move and you’re left holding the string and there goes the balloon, floating off into the air.”

The administration of Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, to its credit, tried to resist Mr. Silverstein.

“Mr. Silverstein’s financial interests should not be the operating principal in the rebuilding,” a deputy mayor, Daniel L. Doctoroff, noted years back. “The guiding force has to be the excellence of design and creating the right demand.”

Yes, well. Mr. Silverstein is no political naïf.

Around that time, he began referring to then-Gov. George E. Pataki by his first name. And the subsidies kept coming.

Late last year, Mr. Silverstein discovered that he had somehow not pulled down $340 million in federal recovery zone bonds for 3 World Trade Center. And, alas, the deadline to apply had ended in 2010.

Not to worry. Senator Charles E. Schumer went to Jacob J. Lew, the Treasury secretary, and the Internal Revenue Service. Shazzam! Mr. Silverstein had his money.

Mr. Schumer’s logic was beautifully circular. It went like this: The terrorist attack threatened doom for downtown. Then the federal, state and city governments spent billions of dollars and “now downtown is thriving.”

That’s why the federal government should give out hundreds of millions of dollars in new bonds to finish the game.

Question too much of this, and you hear a lot of talk of patriotism. Mr. Silverstein has often said he simply wants to do his public duty.

I asked Mr. Lipper about this one.

“I’m as patriotic as the next guy,” he said. “But when patriotism and symbolism are contrary to common sense, it moves from patriotism to vanity.”

And cha-ching to that.

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| Adoptee dumps placement for real mother thanks to Facebook!

Is this the story that proves blood IS thicker than water? Her adoring adoptive parents gave her an idyllic childhood. Yet Kayleigh’s rejected them for the mother who’s found her on Facebook ~ DAILY MAIL.

  • Kayleigh Watts put into care because of birth parents’ violent relationship
  • Adopted by couple in Worcestershire cottage who were unable to conceive
  • 22-year-old said ‘controlling’ adopted parents smothered her with attention
  • Birth mother, Sarah Mowbray got in touch through Facebook
  • Kayleigh left adoptive parents and has now moved to near Sarah

By RICHARD PRICE

Growing up in the heart of the English countryside, playing in the fields and riding horses, Kayleigh Marie Watts enjoyed what sounds like a perfect childhood — especially as she had been taken into care by social services at five years old because of the violent, dysfunctional relationship of her birth parents.

 

To the 90,000 British children languishing in the care system, she would have seemed one of the lucky ones.

After her difficult start in life, Kayleigh was placed with a foster family who were so smitten with the blonde, blue-eyed youngster that they adopted her.

Instead of being raised in institutions, she moved into a cosy cottage in Worcestershire and settled into family life with Len and Monica Watts, then in their 40s, and their older adopted son Mark, 11.

The couple, unable to have children of their own, were thrilled. Their dream had been fulfilled.

‘They’d tried for many years to have kids but in the end had to accept it just wasn’t meant to be.

‘I’m sure it was very hard for them but they didn’t really like to talk about it with us,’ says Kayleigh, now 22.

Settled at the village primary school and revelling in her parents’ undivided attention, as a youngster Kayleigh was thriving.

Little was said about the early years of her life, though she knew her surname had been Thomas.

Any questions were quietly batted away by her parents and she soon learned not to ask questions about her birth family.

‘When Mark and I came along I think we gave them something they were really missing,’ says Kayleigh. ‘They gave everything to us and were great fun. As a little child I couldn’t have asked for more.’

 

Len, a welder, supported the family, as Monica had given up her nursing job to fulfil her dream of motherhood.

Always there for the children after school, she would help them with homework and took great pleasure in cooking for the family.

Len, though equally devoted, was the head of the household. His word was law and at the time — after experiencing the chaos of children’s homes — Kayleigh was happy just to know where she stood.

Kayleigh aged three

Kayleigh Watts is now

Kayleigh, pictured left aged three, was taken into social care at five because her birth parents had a violent dysfunctional relationship. Now, 22, she has shunned her adoptive parents after her birth mother made contact through Facebook

 

So why, then, when the birth mother who gave Kayleigh up for adoption got in touch with her on Facebook five months ago, did she leave the adoptive family who raised her without so much as a backward glance?

Kayleigh claims that, far from being abusive or unkind, the adoptive parents who raised her simply loved her too much, smothering her with affection.

She says that, having battled so hard to have a family of their own, they were unable to let Kayleigh go as she matured into an adult, so much so that she felt like a virtual prisoner in their home.

Kayleigh, aged two before being adopted, is pictured here with her birth mother Sarah

Kayleigh, aged two before being adopted, is pictured here with her birth mother Sarah

 

So when her birth mother, Sarah Mowbray, got in touch in November after searching through every Kayleigh Marie on Facebook, Kayleigh wasted little time in leaving the family home and moving in with her.

Cosy nights in watching television with Len, 69, and Monica, 61, have been swapped for bingo, copious cigarettes and pints of Carling lager with 41-year-old Sarah.

It isn’t immediately clear why Kayleigh would choose to exchange her adoptive parents’ stable, comfortable home for the comparatively chaotic existence of her birth mother.

Sarah had a series of dysfunctional relationships and a son, Daniel, 15, by a different father before settling down with Terry Mowbray, 39, an unemployed farm worker.

Cosy nights in watching television with Len, 69, and Monica, 61, have been swapped for bingo, copious cigarettes and pints of Carling lager with 41-year-old Sarah

Cosy nights in watching television with Len, 69, and Monica, 61, have been swapped for bingo, copious cigarettes and pints of Carling lager with 41-year-old Sarah

 

Yet Kayleigh is adamant that life with her birth mother is far preferable to living with a couple whose desperate desire for children led their adoptive daughter to feel suffocated with love.

‘If you’d asked me when I was 15 what life was like with my parents, I would have told you it was brilliant,’ she says confidently.

‘I was the apple of their eye, probably more so than Mark, and I never really noticed that they were quite controlling because I had everything I wanted.’

Looking back, though, the first event to shake the family happened when she was 11.

Kayleigh pictured aged one. Kayleigh is adamant that life with her birth mother is far preferable to living with a couple whose desperate desire for children led their adoptive daughter to feel suffocated with love

Kayleigh pictured aged one. Kayleigh is adamant that life with her birth mother is far preferable to living with a couple whose desperate desire for children led their adoptive daughter to feel suffocated with love

 

While she was perfectly content, she claims that her brother Mark could no longer stand their parents’ strict rules and what she describes as the ‘stifling’ atmosphere at home.

One morning, at the age of 17, he left and didn’t come back.

‘He just set off for school in the morning and we never saw him again,’ says Kayleigh.

‘I knew they’d been arguing but at the time I didn’t realise how bad it was. He said they’d been controlling him all the time, telling him who he could be friends with and what he was allowed to do.

‘He got a lift to Hereford with a friend and that’s where he’s been ever since. To me at the time it was totally confusing. My parents were devastated and kept trying to call him, to get him back, but he didn’t want to know.

‘Now I can see that’s when things started to change for me, too. They had always been quite controlling, but it gradually got worse and worse.

‘I hardly saw my friends from school and even when I saw my cousins they never really left me to play with them. My life was with my mum and dad, and that was it.

‘When I was 16 or 17, reaching the age when I was ready to grow up and explore the world, everything changed. They went from being loving parents to people who were wrapping me in cotton wool. It’s like my life happened in two parts: first happy, then totally and utterly miserable.’

There is, of course, another possible explanation for Kayleigh’s clashes with her adoptive parents: straightforward youthful rebellion.

Most teenagers don’t like following their parents’ rules — but then most don’t have another mother to run to when things at home are tough.

For their part, Mr and Mrs Watts refused to comment on Kayleigh’s claims. Speaking from their home, Mrs Watts said: ‘We don’t want to get involved in this at all. ’

Kayleigh is now 22 and looks like her mother at the same age, Sarah says

Sarah aged 23, found her birth daughter after she found a picture of Kayleigh on Facebook which reminded her of herself at the same age

Sarah was just 21 when Kayleigh was taken into care. She said she was ‘vulnerable’ and just a kid. Sarah is pictured right aged 23. Kayleigh is pictured left now aged 22

 

 

Kayleigh claims that her adoptive parents’ struggle to conceive left them so desperate for a family that they were unable to cope when their children turned into teenagers and became more independent.

‘I can see that they must have really wanted children, and they were really fantastic adoptive parents at first,’ she says. ‘The problems came when I started to develop a personality of my own — when I wanted to see the world outside the family unit.

‘They were incapable of accepting that, and their control got tighter and tighter until I felt like I couldn’t breathe.’

Though there is no suggestion that the couple were abusive towards their children, Kayleigh says her brother’s departure, coupled with her maturing into a teenager, damaged the family beyond repair.

Kayleigh, aged two living in a children's home before she was adopted. Kayleigh claims that her adoptive parents¿ struggle to conceive left them so desperate for a family that they were unable to cope when their children turned into teenagers and became more independent

Kayleigh, aged two living in a children’s home before she was adopted. Kayleigh claims that her adoptive parents¿ struggle to conceive left them so desperate for a family that they were unable to cope when their children turned into teenagers and became more independent

 

Despite getting reasonably good GCSEs in maths, English, science and food technology, Kayleigh decided against doing A-levels and  instead found work, first as an apprentice hairdresser and later as a care worker.

‘Everything really fell apart when I was 17, when I started to see more of the world outside and wanted to spend time with different people,’ she says.

‘Mum and Dad just wouldn’t allow it. I wasn’t allowed to go out, I had my phone taken off me and I wasn’t allowed to have a boyfriend. I was 21 years old before I got my first boyfriend.

‘It was so different to the way they treated me when I was younger, I didn’t know what to do. I felt like a prisoner in my own home.’

When Kayleigh was 18 she tried to run away for the first time.

Kayleigh as a new born. After arguments with her adoptive parents, she begun the process of seeking contact with her birth mother through the local authority

Kayleigh as a new born. After arguments with her adoptive parents, she begun the process of seeking contact with her birth mother through the local authority

 

‘My parents found me walking to the bus stop with a bag over my shoulder. They just grabbed me and took me home. After that I was banned from going out of the house altogether for a while.’

Miserable and isolated, she began to self-harm, slitting her wrists and hiding them with long-sleeved tops.

‘It’s hard to explain the feeling but the pain of cutting myself was a way of controlling the pain I had inside,’ she says. ‘It was a pleasurable feeling because it was a sort of release.

‘I know my parents thought they were protecting me but actually it was killing me. I’m convinced they just didn’t want me to grow up. They had wanted children so badly and now they didn’t want to let their daughter go.

‘I told them they were suffocating me, but they acted as if I belonged to them and no matter what I did or said they would carry on as  they pleased.

She may have been given up for adoption but surely, Kayleigh reasoned, she would have more in common with her own flesh and blood than with her adoptive parents. She is pictured here at 18 months in a children's home

She may have been given up for adoption but surely, Kayleigh reasoned, she would have more in common with her own flesh and blood than with her adoptive parents. She is pictured here at 18 months in a children’s home

 

‘It was as if all that love they had for me turned into something terrible. Like it didn’t matter how I felt because I was theirs and that was all there was to it.’

The rows escalated and a second attempt to leave, in which she fled to her boyfriend’s home, was foiled after her parents tracked down the address and, she says, brought her home.

Meanwhile, quietly, she had begun the process of seeking contact with her birth mother through the local authority.

She may have been given up for adoption but surely, Kayleigh reasoned, she would have more in common with her own flesh and blood than with her adoptive parents.

Kayleigh thought that Sarah may have been given up for adoption but surely, Kayleigh reasoned, she would have more in common with her own flesh and blood than with her adoptive parents

Kayleigh thought that Sarah may have been given up for adoption but surely, Kayleigh reasoned, she would have more in common with her own flesh and blood than with her adoptive parents

 

Three weeks later, fate hurried things along. Sarah, by then happily married with a teenage son, had spent seven years trying to track down Kayleigh and was painstakingly trawling through Facebook.

Contacting adopted children in this way is regarded by professionals as potentially harmful. But going through official channels had failed to yield results and Sarah —  who says she was ‘so vulnerable  and just a kid myself’ (she was 21) when social services took Kayleigh — decided to pursue her  own investigations.

The early flurry of online exchanges between the pair makes fascinating reading. Although she was thrilled to have found her mother, there is clear reticence on Kayleigh’s part.

They make painstaking arrangements for letters to be exchanged through the official Adoption Post Box system (a formal means for birth parents and adopted children to contact each other).

But in mid-December the communication between Kayleigh and Sarah goes quiet. At this time, Kayleigh says, Len and Monicas were monitoring all her communications.

‘I was scared of them,’ she says quietly.

It was only on March 18 this year that the conversation resumed on Facebook, when Kayleigh sent the simple message: ‘Hi mum x.’

When Sarah asked if she was allowed to reply, Kayleigh wrote: ‘Of course you are. I’ve moved out now so I can do what I want xx’.

The following day they met for the first time and have not stopped talking since. Kayleigh had enough savings to pay the deposit on a flat in Malvern, near Sarah, and has been interviewed for a new job in a care home.

‘I’ve always worked and I love the work I do, so I was always going to get back to it as soon as possible,’ she says.

‘In the end, leaving home was easy. I went upstairs and wrote a note explaining everything, then packed a bag and went to work a night shift. The next morning, instead of going home, I got a lift to Worcester with a friend and I haven’t looked back.’

Her adoptive parents, meanwhile, have been left bereft by their daughter¿s absence. ¿Of course it¿s sad to leave my adoptive family behind but I had to make a choice,¿ says Kayleigh

Her adoptive parents, meanwhile, have been left bereft by their daughter¿s absence. ¿Of course it¿s sad to leave my adoptive family behind but I had to make a choice,¿ says Kayleigh

 

Her adoptive parents, meanwhile, have been left bereft by their daughter’s absence.

‘Of course it’s sad to leave my adoptive family behind but I had to make a choice,’ says Kayleigh.

‘My dad always wanted to be in control of us. I told him and Mum they were smothering me, that I felt like they’d locked me up.

‘A couple of days ago I tracked down my brother on Facebook and we had our first conversation in years.

‘The first thing he asked me was why I didn’t leave years ago. I told him it was because I never had  his courage.

‘The sad thing is that he never for one second questioned my decision to walk out.

‘They had always wanted children so badly, but in the end they drove us both away.’

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